Archive for the ‘Tides and Currents’ Category

What are the Roaring Forties?



During the Age of Sail (circa 15th to 19th centuries), these strong prevailing winds propelled ships across the Pacific, often at breakneck speed. Nevertheless, sailing west into heavy seas and strong headwinds could take weeks, especially around Cape Horn at the southern tip of South America, making it one of the most treacherous sailing passages in the world. The Roaring Forties take shape as warm air near the equator rises and moves toward the poles. Warm air moving poleward (on both sides of the equator) is the result of nature trying to reduce the temperature difference between the equator and at the poles created by uneven heating from the sun.

Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

What are the doldrums?



Known to sailors around the world as the doldrums, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, (ITCZ, pronounced and sometimes referred to as the “itch”), is a belt around the Earth extending approximately five degrees north and south of the equator. Here, the prevailing trade winds of the northern hemisphere blow to the southwest and collide with the southern hemisphere’s driving northeast trade winds.

Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

What is a NOAA tide table?


A tide table provides daily high and low tide predictions. NOAA tide tables are available for more than 3,000 locations around the nation. NOAA’s Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services and predecessor agencies have produced tide tables for more than 150 years.

Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

How does NOAA monitor water levels around the nation?

NOAA monitors water levels in the U.S. with the National Water Level Observation Network.


Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

What is a turbidity current?

A turbidity current is a rapid, downhill flow of water caused by increased density due to high amounts of sediment.

Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

What is an Operational Forecast System?

An Operational Forecast System provides a nowcast and forecast of oceanographic conditions.


Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

Why does the ocean have waves?

This item was filled under Basics, Facts, Ocean Observations, Tides and Currents
Waves are created by energy passing through water, causing it to move in a circular motion.

Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

What is PORTS®?

PORTS® stands for Physical Oceanographic Real Time System. NOAA PORTS® is an information system that measures and disseminates the oceanographic and meteorological data that mariners need to navigate safely.

Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

What are the horse latitudes?

The horse latitudes are regions of the subtropics characterized by calm winds and little precipitation.
.


Continue reading →

...

Continue reading...

Why do we have spring tides in the fall?

This item was filled under Basics, Facts, Tides and Currents
A spring tide refers to the 'springing forth' of the tide during new and full moon....

Continue reading...