Archive for January, 2011

NOAA’s Navigation Services: Evolving Beyond Navigation [What's New]

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A whole lot of data collection is going on in Mobile Bay, Alabama! NOAA scientists are now collecting info by ship, satellite, aircraft, and even autonomous underwater vehicles. Why? They're testing just how useful NOAA navigation information can be for other uses -- like emergency management and response, coastal engineering, and ecosystem restoration. The Mobile Bay project may serve as a model for how NOAA navigation data is collected, repackaged, and reused to help coastal communities around the nation....

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Surf’s up: New research provides precise way to monitor ocean wave behavior, shore impacts

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Engineers have created a new type of "stereo vision" to use in studying ocean waves as they pound against the shore, providing a better way to understand and monitor this violent, ever-changing environment....

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Air above Dead Sea contains very high levels of oxidized mercury

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Measurements show that the sea's salt has profound effects on the chemistry of the air above its surface. The atmosphere over the Dead Sea, researchers have found, is laden with oxidized mercury. Some of the highest levels of oxidized mercury ever observed outside the polar regions exist there....

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More frequent drought likely in eastern Africa

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The increased frequency of drought observed in eastern Africa over the last 20 years is likely to continue as long as global temperatures continue to rise, according to new research. This poses increased risk to the estimated 17.5 million people in the Greater Horn of Africa who currently face potential food shortages....

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Mass extinction linked to ancient climate change, new details reveal

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About 450 million years ago, Earth suffered the second-largest mass extinction in its history -- the Late Ordovician mass extinction, during which more than 75 percent of marine species died. Exactly what caused this tremendous loss in biodiversity remains a mystery, but now scientists have discovered new details supporting the idea that the mass extinction was linked to a cooling climate....

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Warming North Atlantic water tied to heating Arctic

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The temperatures of North Atlantic Ocean water flowing north into the Arctic Ocean adjacent to Greenland -- the warmest water in at least 2,000 years -- are likely related to the amplification of global warming in the Arctic, says a new study....

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Common ground for ecosystems and fishing in Northwest Mexico

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Researchers have completed a new study on the geography of commercial fisheries in Northwest Mexico and the results could have far-ranging implications for the sustainable future of marine wildlife in the area....

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‘Hidden plumbing’ helps slow Greenland ice flow: Hotter summers may actually slow down flow of glaciers

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Hotter summers may not be as catastrophic for the Greenland ice sheet as previously feared and may actually slow down the flow of glaciers, according to new research....

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Centuries of sailors weren’t wrong: Looking at the horizon stabilizes posture

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Everybody who has been aboard a ship has heard the advice: if you feel unsteady, look at the horizon. For a new study, researchers measured how much people sway on land and at sea and found there's truth in that advice; people aboard a ship are steadier if they fix their eyes on the horizon....

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First study of dispersants in Gulf spill suggests a prolonged deepwater fate

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To combat last year's Deepwater Horizon oil spill, nearly 800,000 gallons of chemical dispersant were injected directly into the oil and gas flow coming out of the wellhead nearly one mile deep in the Gulf of Mexico. Now, chemists report that a major component of the dispersant itself was contained within an oil-gas-laden plume in the deep ocean and had still not degraded some three months after it was applied....

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