Do fish sleep?

This item was filled under Animals, Facts, Ocean Life
While most fish rest by reducing their activity and metabolism, fish "sleep" is different from that of land mammals.

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New producer of crucial vitamin B12 discovered

This item was filled under Climate
A single group of microorganisms may be responsible for much of the world's vitamin B12 production in the oceans, with implications for the global carbon cycle and climate change, researchers have discovered. Thaumarchaeota, they say, are likely dominant vitamin B12 producers....

Small algae with great potential

This item was filled under Climate
The single most important calcifying algae of the world's oceans is able to simultaneously adapt to rising water temperatures and ocean acidification through evolution. A unique long-term experiment with the species Emiliania huxleyi shows that the evolutionary potential of the algae is much greater than previously thought. In their laboratory evolution experiment, the scientists have shown for the first time that evolutionary adaptations to multiple stress factors do not necessarily interfere with each other....

Glaciers in northern Antarctic Peninsula melting faster than ever despite increased snowfall

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Increased snowfall will not prevent the continued melting of glaciers in the northern Antarctic Peninsula, according to new research. Scientists have discovered that small glaciers that end on land around the Antarctic Peninsula are highly vulnerable to slight changes in air temperature and may be at risk of disappearing within 200 years....

Ahoy, offshore wind: Advanced buoys bring vital data to untapped energy resource

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Two large buoys that are decked out with advanced scientific instruments will help more accurately predict offshore wind’s power-producing potential....

Microbes evolve faster than ocean can disperse them

This item was filled under Climate
Scientists have created an advanced model aimed at exploring the role of neutral evolution in the biogeographic distribution of ocean microbes. Over the past sev­eral decades, ecol­o­gists have come to under­stand that both natural selec­tion and neu­tral evolution -- that vari­a­tion within and between species is caused by genetic drift and random mutations -- play a role in the bio­geo­graphic pat­terns of ocean microbes. New results flew in the face of the long held notion that microbes are infi­nitely mobile....

Last decade’s slowdown in global warming enhanced by an unusual climate anomaly

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A hiatus in global warming ongoing since 2001 is due to a combination of a natural cooling phase, known as multidecadal variability (MDV) and a downturn of the secular warming trend. The exact causes of the latter, unique in the entire observational record going back to 1850, are still to be identified, according to a new article....

New study reconstructs mega-earthquakes timeline in Indian Ocean

This item was filled under Climate
A new study on the frequency of past giant earthquakes in the Indian Ocean region shows that Sri Lanka, and much of the Indian Ocean, is affected by large tsunamis at highly variable intervals, from a few hundred to more than 1,000 years. The findings suggest that the accumulation of stress in the region could generate as large, or even larger tsunamis than the one that resulted from the 2004 magnitude-9.2 Sumatra earthquake....

Indian Ocean expedition pioneers citizen oceanography

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Recreational sailors are being called upon to become 'citizen oceanographers' and help provide vital scientific knowledge about the world's oceans by sampling and testing remote waters from their yachts. In 2013, a microbiologist and sailing champion, led an international scientific expedition across the Indian Ocean to pioneer this cost-effective method of data collection. With the right equipment, citizen scientists could gather large quantities of information too, his team says....

Shift in Arabia sea plankton may threaten fisheries

This item was filled under Climate
The rapid rise of an unusual plankton in the Arabian Sea has been documented by researchers who say that it could be disastrous for the predator fish that sustain 120 million people living on the sea's edge. "These blooms are massive, appear year after year, and could be devastating to the Arabian Sea ecosystem over the long-term," said the study's lead author....