Archive for January, 2013

Evidence of geological ‘facelift’ in the Appalachians

This item was filled under Climate
How does a mountain range maintain its youthful, rugged appearance after 200 million years without tectonic activity? Try a geological facelift -- courtesy of Earth's mantle....

Continue reading...

Ozone thinning has changed ocean circulation

This item was filled under Climate
A hole in the Antarctic ozone layer has changed the way that waters in the southern oceans mix, a situation that has the potential to alter the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and eventually could have an impact on global climate change....

Continue reading...

Cyclone did not cause 2012 record low for Arctic sea ice

This item was filled under Climate
It came out of Siberia, swirling winds over an area that covered almost the entire Arctic basin in the normally calm late summer. It came to be known as "The Great Arctic Cyclone of August 2012," and for some observers it suggested that the historic sea ice minimum may have been caused by a freak summer storm, rather than warming temperatures. But new results show that the August cyclone was not responsible for last year's record low for Arctic sea ice....

Continue reading...

New research shows complexity of global warming

This item was filled under Climate
Global warming from greenhouse gases affects rainfall patterns in the world differently than that from solar heating, according to a new study....

Continue reading...

‘Challenger’ Mission Aimed at Sending First Underwater Glider Round the World [What's New]

This item was filled under News
Scientists from Rutgers University, a Mid-Atlantic partner of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®), recently launched a second test mission, called “Challenger,” aimed at sending the first unmanned, underwater robotic vehicle--known as a “glider”--around the world.

The scientists launched the remote-controlled glider from South Africa and plan to fly it to northern Brazil, a mission that could last up to a year. In the first test mission, a glider went from Iceland to the Canary Islands. That glider is also now headed for Brazil.

...

Continue reading...

Tomorrow’s life-saving medications may currently be living at the bottom of the sea

This item was filled under Climate
Two new research articles demonstrate how the next class of powerful medications may currently reside at the bottom of the ocean. In both cases, the researchers were focused on ocean-based mollusks – a category of animal that includes snails, clams and squid and their bacterial companions....

Continue reading...

Antarctic lake beneath the ice sheet tested

This item was filled under Climate
In a first-of-its-kind feat of science and engineering, scientists have successfully drilled through 800 meters (2,600 feet) of Antarctic ice to reach a subglacial lake and retrieve water and sediment samples that have been isolated from direct contact with the atmosphere for many thousands of years....

Continue reading...

Bugs in the atmosphere: Significant microorganism populations found in middle and upper troposphere

This item was filled under Climate
In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, researchers used genomic techniques to document the presence of significant numbers of living microorganisms -- principally bacteria -- in the middle and upper troposphere, that section of the atmosphere approximately four to six miles above Earth's surface....

Continue reading...

Climate change impacts to U.S. coasts threaten public health, safety and economy, report finds

This item was filled under Climate
According to a new technical report, the effects of climate change will continue to threaten the health and vitality of US coastal communities' social, economic and natural systems....

Continue reading...

Groundwater depletion linked to climate change

This item was filled under Climate
Climate change may be exacerbating many countries' experience of water stress, according to new research. Experts explain how several human-driven factors, if not rectified, will combine with climate change to significantly reduce useable groundwater availability for agriculture globally....

Continue reading...